Humility and Compassion for Robust Health and Happiness

Healthy man in nature looking up at the beautiful sky next to a beautiful lake

People should think less about what they ought to do and more about what they ought to be.  If only their being were good, the works would shine forth brightly.”  ~Meister Johannes Eckhart

In times of great social unrest or personal distress, it’s not unusual to ponder existential questions, such as “Who am I?” and “What is the meaning of my life?” I believe that these are valuable questions to ask oneself. But without spiritual and emotional support, this type of deep inquiry can lead to uncertainty, hopelessness, and depression.

Continue reading “Humility and Compassion for Robust Health and Happiness”

Thoughts On Faith

Several months ago I wrote about hope, which grew from my reflections on the meaning of hope and how it differs from optimism. As I’ve continued to reflect on hope and optimism, I’ve found my thoughts turning to the subject of faith.

As a professed Secular Franciscan, I feel a special affinity for St. Francis of Assisi, who espoused the simple virtues of Humility, Generosity, Reverence, Service, Respect, Prayer, Joy, and Love. The teachings of this gentle monk guide my daily life, including my approach to the ETMS. As I consider the subject of faith, the teachings of St. Francis inspire me.

Continue reading “Thoughts On Faith”

Six Targets For Optimal Weight Using Botanicals

 In my last post, I addressed the lifestyle changes that help to gently shift metabolism to a healthier state, which naturally results in achieving optimal weight. Excess weight is often a multi-faceted issue—not surprisingly, the best results are gained with a comprehensive approach. As I stated in my last post, I am not an advocate of a restrictive diet. Instead, I’ve found that providing the body with the nutrients it needs (including botanicals that enhance healthy metabolic function), in conjunction with a healthy and enjoyable lifestyle, results in almost effortless loss of surplus pounds.

Continue reading “Six Targets For Optimal Weight Using Botanicals”

How To Be Healthy and Happy Achieving Your Optimal Weight

If you struggle with weight loss, you’re not alone. According to the Centers for Disease Control, an astonishing 70 percent of Americans are overweight, while only 25 percent of adult Americans are at their proper weight (about 5 percent are underweight). Although most people who are overweight have tried at least one diet, a restrictive diet is the least effective way to lose weight, and may even make you fatter.

A 2011 study published in the International Journal of Obesity found that on average, the more people diet, the more it leads to increased weight gain. Researchers evaluated 2,000 sets of twins, aged 16 to 25 years old.  They found those who embarked on just one intentional weight loss episode were two to three times more likely to become overweight, compared to their non-dieting twin counterpart. Furthermore, the risk of becoming overweight increased with each dieting episode.1

Continue reading “How To Be Healthy and Happy Achieving Your Optimal Weight”

Simple Tips For Happiness

To achieve optimal health and well-being, we must not only pay attention to how we care for ourselves physically, but we must also attend to our emotional, intellectual, and spiritual well-being and happiness. This may involve questioning long-held beliefs and ways of being in the world that no longer serve us.

For example, most of us worry from time to time—and some people worry most of the time. But the reality is that worrying is a futile activity. Worrying about world events, other people’s lives, or even your own life has no effect on outcome. In fact, worrying does nothing except create fear and unhappiness in the precious moments of your life. But interestingly enough, while worrying doesn’t ever improve a situation, cultivating an attitude of happiness and trust can.

Continue reading “Simple Tips For Happiness”

Reflections on a Spirit-Filled Life

There isn’t a day that goes by that I don’t ask myself these two questions: “Where am I, and who am I?” These may seem simplistic, when considered as superficial queries. But my inquiry is rooted within the context of relationships: My relationship to my inner being and outer self, to others, to nature, to the universe, and to God, whose existence is found in all of these.

When we understand the interconnectedness of all of our relationships, we have the opportunity to experience a harmonious balance of spirit, heart, mind, and body. All too often, we ignore spirit and heart and focus instead on the physical aspects of life, and the mind only as it relates to the goals of the material world.

Continue reading “Reflections on a Spirit-Filled Life”