Baking cookies and sharing them with friends is part of our family’s holiday tradition. This year, I created a new recipe that I’d like to share with you. It’s a delicious holiday treat (made with spelt, walnuts, and other healthy ingredients) that I hope you’ll enjoy as much as we do!

Ingredients:

  • 4 oz butter (1 stick butter)
  • 2 oz coconut oil
  • 1 ½ teaspoon vanilla

    Walnut-Coconut Crescent Holiday Cookies

  • ½ cup maple syrup
  • 1/3 cup coconut sugar
  • 1 cup oat flour
  • 1 cup sprouted spelt flour *
  • ½ cup Pamela’s baking mix
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 ½ cups chopped walnuts*
  • 1 cup shredded coconut, toasted on stove for 2 minutes, stirring frequently

Sugar and spice topping:

  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp. cardamom
  • 2 tsp. maple sugar
  • 1 tsp. coconut milk powder

Instructions:

  1. Soften butter and mix with coconut oil and vanilla. Beat in maple syrup and coconut sugar.
  2. Sift oat flour, spelt flour, baking mix, and sea salt and add to wet ingredients.
  3. Fold in chopped walnuts and coconut.
  4. Shape into crescents and refrigerate for at least 1 hour before baking.
  5. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F convection.
  6. Bake cookies for 20-25 minutes, or until golden brown.
  7. Remove from oven, place on rack to cool, and using a sifter, dust cookies with the sugar and spice mixture.

read more

I’m often asked what I consider to be the healthiest diet. Through decades of nutritional research and experimentation, I’m convinced that a diet of primarily organic, plant-based Mediterranean foods—including whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, eggs, dairy products (cow, goat and sheep milk derived) and healthy fats (mostly olive oil), with fish and seafood playing a key role as a main protein source—is by far the best diet for long term health. The term “pesca-flexa-vegetarian” comes closest to describing the diet that my family and I eat.

salmon-salad

 

 

 


read more

First discovered in 1929, vitamin K has long been recognized as necessary for healthy blood clotting. This, of course, is a critical function—without sufficient vitamin K, we would bleed to death from even a minor wound. But in the past decade, vitamin K has been shown to play a much greater role in health than was previously recognized.

Research shows that vitamin K, in synergy with vitamin D, is an essential nutrient for building strong bones. Vitamin K also supports cardiovascular health, promotes an appropriate inflammatory response, ensures healthy cellular function, and provides redox/antioxidant activity.


read more

In my two previous posts on thyroid health, I discussed the potential problems associated with diagnosing and treating thyroid issues. As I stated in my first post, thyroid problems are frequently under diagnosed, primarily because of inadequate testing and incomplete understanding of the complexities of thyroid function. At the same time, thyroid problems are often treated in ways that further compromise function.


read more

Most of you know that I enjoy cooking—my intention is to create food that is not only delicious, but deeply nourishing. As an herbalist, I’m especially interested in the health benefits of common herbs and spices used in culinary traditions around the world. My Italian heritage means that basil, oregano, and rosemary play a prominent role in our kitchen, but our shelves are filled with a wide variety of spices and herbs. One of my favorites is turmeric, a deep golden yellow powder that is best known as an ingredient in East Indian curries. Throughout history, turmeric has been valued as a spice, food preservative, dye (giving Buddhist robes their familiar golden color), and most importantly, as a powerful plant medicine. A close relative of ginger, turmeric grows in southern India, China, and Indonesia.


read more

When I think of foods that have “super” health-promoting properties, berries are on my list of top ten favorites. Not only are they delicious, but bilberries, black currants, blackberries, blueberries, cranberries, elderberries, raspberries, strawberries—in fact, every berry you can think of—offer an enormous range of health benefits. What all of these berries have in common are anthocyanins—the pigments that give them their rich deep red and purple coloring. Although berries are perhaps the best-known sources of anthocyanins, other foods with the same colorants—for example, beets, cherries, eggplant, plums, pomegranates, purple cabbage, purple grapes, and red onions—also contain these valuable compounds. Grape seed extract, an especially rich source of anthocyanins, is the most widely researched anthocyanin supplement. Another excellent anthocyanin source—and one of my favorites—is a blend of fruit anthocyanins, which contains red grape, elderberry, blueberry, aronia berry, pomegranate, and red raspberry.


read more