This nourishing soup is a delicious way to naturally boost your immunity. Traditionally prepared in cultures throughout the world, bone broth is easily digested and provides a wealth of nutritional and immune support factors. The long simmering required for making bone broth is necessary for extracting the marrow, which contains myeloid stem cells (the precursors to red blood cells) and lymphoid stem cells (the precursors to white blood cells and platelets). Red blood cells deliver oxygen to cells throughout the body, white blood cells are an essential component of the immune system, and platelets are needed for clotting.


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“Everybody can be great, because everybody can serve. You only need a heart full of grace, a soul generated by love.”

~ Dr. Martin Luther King

Our brains have the remarkable capacity to adapt and change throughout our lives. This ability to form and reorganize neural pathways in response to learning, experience, injury, disease, or aging is called neuroplasticity.

Neuroplasticity helps the brain process sensory input along with creating suitable adaptive responses to stimuli. Neurons must have purpose to survive, and those with weak or ineffective connections are pruned. Through a variety of structural and molecular mechanisms, neurons compensate for injury or disease.


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Baking cookies and sharing them with friends is part of our family’s holiday tradition. This year, I created a new recipe that I’d like to share with you. It’s a delicious holiday treat (made with spelt, walnuts, and other healthy ingredients) that I hope you’ll enjoy as much as we do!

Ingredients:

  • 4 oz butter (1 stick butter)
  • 2 oz coconut oil
  • 1 ½ teaspoon vanilla

    Walnut-Coconut Crescent Holiday Cookies

  • ½ cup maple syrup
  • 1/3 cup coconut sugar
  • 1 cup oat flour
  • 1 cup sprouted spelt flour *
  • ½ cup Pamela’s baking mix
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 ½ cups chopped walnuts*
  • 1 cup shredded coconut, toasted on stove for 2 minutes, stirring frequently

Sugar and spice topping:

  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp. cardamom
  • 2 tsp. maple sugar
  • 1 tsp. coconut milk powder

Instructions:

  1. Soften butter and mix with coconut oil and vanilla. Beat in maple syrup and coconut sugar.
  2. Sift oat flour, spelt flour, baking mix, and sea salt and add to wet ingredients.
  3. Fold in chopped walnuts and coconut.
  4. Shape into crescents and refrigerate for at least 1 hour before baking.
  5. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F convection.
  6. Bake cookies for 20-25 minutes, or until golden brown.
  7. Remove from oven, place on rack to cool, and using a sifter, dust cookies with the sugar and spice mixture.

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I’m often asked what I consider to be the healthiest diet. Through decades of nutritional research and experimentation, I’m convinced that a diet of primarily organic, plant-based Mediterranean foods—including whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, eggs, dairy products (cow, goat and sheep milk derived) and healthy fats (mostly olive oil), with fish and seafood playing a key role as a main protein source—is by far the best diet for long term health. The term “pesca-flexa-vegetarian” comes closest to describing the diet that my family and I eat.

salmon-salad

 

 

 


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First discovered in 1929, vitamin K has long been recognized as necessary for healthy blood clotting. This, of course, is a critical function—without sufficient vitamin K, we would bleed to death from even a minor wound. But in the past decade, vitamin K has been shown to play a much greater role in health than was previously recognized.

Research shows that vitamin K, in synergy with vitamin D, is an essential nutrient for building strong bones. Vitamin K also supports cardiovascular health, promotes an appropriate inflammatory response, ensures healthy cellular function, and provides redox/antioxidant activity.


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In my two previous posts on thyroid health, I discussed the potential problems associated with diagnosing and treating thyroid issues. As I stated in my first post, thyroid problems are frequently under diagnosed, primarily because of inadequate testing and incomplete understanding of the complexities of thyroid function. At the same time, thyroid problems are often treated in ways that further compromise function.


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